Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg

Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg
Universitätsplatz 7
06120 Halle/Saale
Germany
www.uni-halle.de

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry which is headed by Prof. Wolfgang Sippl, consist of five working groups focussed on in silico drug design, drug synthesis, and analytics. In the individual working groups, 15 researchers, 26 PhD students and 15 assistants are working on pharmaceutically relevant drug targets, such as nuclear hormone receptors, anti-inflammatory targets, and histone modifying enzymes. A major focus lies on the in silico analysis of proteindrug interaction and understanding biological effects. The chemical laboratories contain all necessary equipment for drug synthesis, testing and analytics whereas the drug design group has all necessary resources (hardware and software) for chemoinformatics and computational chemistry. Teaching of of about 600 pharmacy students is carried out on all aspects of pharmaceutical and medicinal chemistry including basic principles of silico drug development.

Key staff involved:

Wolfgang Sippl
Wolfgang Sippl is Professor for Medicinal Chemistry and Head of the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the Martin-Luther-University of Halle-Wittenberg (Germany). He obtained a Ph. D. in Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of Düsseldorf in the group of Hans-Dieter Höltje and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Université Louis-Pasteur in Strasbourg (France) where he worked with Camille G. Wermuth. He then took a senior researcher position in Düsseldorf before moving to the University of Halle-Wittenberg as a full professor in 2003. Currently he is the director of the Institute of Pharmacy in Halle. His main interests are focussed on computational chemistry and structure-based drug design of epigenetic modulators.

Matthias Schmidt
Pharmacist, senior researcher in the Medicinal Chemistry group. He has a strong background on drug synthesis (multi drug resistance modulators, glycolipids, kinase inhibitors) and analytics. He is involved in the teaching of pharmaceutical chemistry and analytics for pharmacy students and organizes practical courses in pharmaceutical chemistry. He is responsible for two PhD students, working on the tructure-based development of kinase inhibitors.

Ralf Heinke
Pharmacist, PhD student in the Medicinal Chemistry group. He is working on the in silico based development of novel inhibitors for epigenetic targets. He has a strong skill in programming and computational chemistry.

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