Archives for posts with tag: ethnography

Doing (n)ethnographic research right?

Workshop and talk

with Jakob Svensson, Director HumanIT (www.kau.se/en/humanit) and Ass. Prof. in Media and Communication Studies (Karlstad University)

Introduction by Philipp Budka (Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Vienna) and Judith Schossböck (Zentrum für eGovernance, Donau-Universität Krems).

In an era of big data, studies of online communities gather impressive numbers of collected data sometimes generating fancy twitter maps through network visualization tools among other things. While acknowledging the importance of quantitive studies and mixed methods approaches, this event wishes to focus on qualitative research of online communities. There is a need to get behind the numbers and ask questions of why and how in order to fully understand communication in online communities. But how to do such (n)ethnographic research right?

This event will discuss this based on a range of presentation from internet researchers current studying online communities and phenomena. Among other topics, we would like to address questions of access, entry, participation, anonymity and (research) ethics. We have no clear answers yet on to how to do (n)ethnographic research right. Thus we invite you to discuss different approaches to internet research and to share your experiences.

Ort und Zeit:

Raum D / quartier21QDK / Electric Avenue, MQ, Museumsplatz 1, A-1070 Wien
10.12.2012, ab 18:00 Uhr
(keine Anmeldung nötig)

Fragen/Questions:

Jakob Svensson: jakob.svensson (at) kau.se
Gruppe Internetforschung:  internetforschung.sowi (at) univie.ac.at

Bloggers as Early Adopters of Public Opinion: Ethnography  of Influencing Networked Publics

For half a century communication researchers have been putting to the test theories of mass media effects on public opinion. However, the blogosphere‘s ability to influence public opinion is not yet backed by consistent empirical evidence or an account of the relevant practices. Read the rest of this entry »