SS 2013 | SE | 2Std. | LVA 390045 | http://www.univie.ac.at/knowledge/peschl/teaching/wthse2/phd_management/

PhD-M: Philosophy of Science

Foundations and Practicing Collaborative Knowledge Construction and Design Thinking in Science and Technology

site navigation:

Home/Syllabus

Registration

units: A3 Philosophy of science


units: B knowledge creation/pesencing

B0: Questions

B1: Emergent Fields

B2: Co-Initiating

B3: Negotiating Observation

B4: Deep Observation

B5: Creating Collective Sense Organs

B6: Presencing

B7: Crystallizing & Prototyping

B8: Creating New Realities

B9: Reflection & Theory

 

a Diretions to outdoor location

a TBA

 

ao.Univ.Prof.Dr. Markus F. Peschl

Gloria Bottaro

University of Vienna

keywords: collaborative knowledge construction | dialogue | knowledge creation/generation | knowledge technologies | learning | philosophy of science | presencing | (radical) innovation | reflection | science | U-theory |

There are still places left — for further information contact M.Peschl

> Syllabus/Home


page navigation: Syllabus & contents | Course design | Topics & dates | Grading | Contact |


Syllabus, Contents, and Learning Outcomes

up

Content

Introduction—motivation

One of the core assumptions of this course is that thinking, learning, teaching, and doing science is not so much about merely solving problems or puzzles as well as answering questions by applying and repeating well-proven patterns (in small variations) from the past. Rather, the purpose of these cognitive activities is to be prepared for the future. In most cases today’s (as well as tomorrow’s) challenges and questions are radically different from the past—they cross disciplinary boundaries, they are dealing with a large set of unknown variables, they involve many constraints (and stakeholders), they are open-ended, sometimes the problems themselves are changing during the process of research, they need a great deal of synthetic rather than analytic capacities, they have to be thought of from the perspective of the future (rather than extrapolated from the past), etc. That is why we are in need of fundamentally different approaches, attitudes, as well as cognitive-/thinking-/knowledge-tools for tackling these issues of creating radically new knowledge in almost every field (of science, society, technology, everyday life, etc.).

Course description

This course gives both a theoretical overview on the foundations of (philosophy of) science and a hands-on introduction into practicing science and, more specifically, the process of creating radically/profoundly new knowledge. In the first part we explore what science is, what its goals are, what it does, how it works, what its limits are, and what are its basic assumptions about knowledge, methods, the world, etc. We take a closer look at the processes involved in developing scientific knowledge/models; we follow the path from the phenomenon of interest, via the processes of observation, measuring, interpreting data, applying statistical methods, forming hypotheses, constructing scientific models/theories, making predictions and experimental designs, and finally “manipulating” the phenomenon of interest in an experiment (or simulation). These knowledge processes are reflected from the perspective of your respective discipline and research questions. We will discover that it is not really clear what the epistemological status of the resulting (scientific) knowledge is and—as a consequence—we will have to question classical concepts of science, such as that science gives us a true and objective picture of the world, that science is independent of observer and cultural influences, etc. Alternative concepts, such as Kuhn’s scientific paradigms, the constructivist perspective, and others will be discussed as possible ways out.

The second part of this course addresses a crucial process in science: the generation of (radically) new knowledge. Students will conduct a practical knowledge creation project in interdisciplinary teams. The goal of this project is to achieve an expertise in state-of-the-art knowledge creation techniques (and their theoretical background), such as dialogue, reflection, world café, making explicit implicit assumptions, U-theory/presencing, different modes of deep observation, conducting generative interviews, deep knowing/understanding, etc. This part of the course aims at practically experiencing this socio-epistemological process/technology of generating (radically) new (scientific) knowledge in an interdisciplinary and collaborative context.

The course is designed in such a way that there will be enough space for reflection of your research projects and your questions.

Guding questions
  • What is science? How does it work? Why are we doing science?
  • What is a/the scientific method?
  • What is the difference between scientific knowledge and other forms of knowledge?
  • How do we come from an observation to a scientific model?
  • What can a scientific theory/model tell us about the world? What are its strengths and its limits?
  • What is (radically) new knowledge? How does (radically) new knowledge come into being?
  • What is knowledge construction in science? How do we collaboratively construct knowledge?
  • What is knowledge work and what are knowledge technologies? What are main tools in this field and how do they work?
Learning Outcomes & Goals

Subject specific

  • Knowledge and understanding of central questions, key concepts, approaches, and core terminology in philosophy of science
  • Understanding und practical experience of knowledge technologies, socio-epistemological technologies, techniques of knowledge creation, and interdisciplinary cooperation.
  • Gain insight into the field and scientific culture of philosophy of science
  • Understanding and awareness of strengths and weaknesses of scientific knowledge
  • Awareness of the differences in scientific cultures and terminologies
  • Basic knowledge and understanding of the history of philosophy of science as a field
  • Understanding of the relationship between natural sciences, humanities, and other forms of scientific and (so-called) non-scientific knowledge

Methodological

  • Gain familiarity with methods of knowledge creation, investigating reality, and knowledge technologies relevant in scientific processes
  • Gain familiarity with a range of methodological and epistemological approaches and their methodologies relevant to philosophy of science and discern differences and commonalities between them

Generic

Instrumental

  • Ability to read, present, and discuss philosophy of science relevant literature
  • Ability to critically think and to reflect on different approaches in an interdisciplinary context
  • Ability to work both in an analytical and synthetic mode
  • Ability to assume a meta-perspective and to think in larger contexts
  • Ability to reflect on one’s implicit assumptions concerning one’s discipline or approach

Interpersonal

  • Ability to communicate in physical and virtual environments
  • Ability to discuss different points of view in an interdisciplinary team
  • Ability to organize group activities
  • Ability to appreciate individual expertise

Systemic

  • Ability to reflect upon and discuss individual motivation and interests in the context of ones personal and scientific identity
Teaching Methods & Course Design

The main didactical goal of this course is to learn by jointly generating, sharing, negotiating, and creating (new) knowledge. This course consists of two parts: the first part follows a classical seminar format whereas the second part is rather project oriented (with theoretical grounding).

This course makes use of a wide variety of didactical elements contributing to reaching the learning outcomes in a well-orchestrated design. Among these measures are:

  • preparing presentations and whole didactical designs for a specific topic
  • close reading of texts
  • collaborative knowledge construction using face-to-face (f2f) and virtual knowledge techniques
  • observation techniques, deep observation
  • generative interview, appreciative interview
  • co-creating (radically new) knowledge
  • coaching elements offered by teachers
  • dialogue
  • World café
  • discovering, exploring, and negotiating hidden assumptions and mental models
  • a selection of phases of the U-theory and presencing
  • prototyping technique

A more detailed explanation can be found in the course design section.

Target Group

This course is mainly designed as an advanced philosophy of science module for PhD- and advanced masters students. It is open for students from all disciplines who want to get an overview of the field of philosophy of science and who are interested in state-of-the-art knowledge creation technologies. This course is explicitly designed for an interdisciplinary audience; students are expected to be open to other disciplines/perspectives, to share their knowledge, to reflect their (hidden) assumptions, as well as to be involved personally. Students from the PhD-Management program have higher priority to enter this course.

   

 

 

Course/Module design

up

 

The main didactical goal of this course is to learn by jointly generating, sharing, negotiating, and creating (new) knowledge. This course consists of two parts: the first part follows a classical seminar format whereas the second part is rather project oriented (with theoretical grounding).

Part A: Foundations of (philosophy of) science

In this part students will work in groups on basic issues in philosophy of science in a seminar style design. Each group is responsible for a particular paradigm or question as well as for the didactical design of their unit: this includes presentation(s), space for practical applications and student interaction, reflection, open questions, as well as moderation of discussions. Above that, an “observation group” for presenting the theoretical background in the final session & for doing action research on the whole seminar (group) during the semester is installed (however, each member participates also in a KCT).

The presentations have to be discussed with the instructors one week in advance of the scheduled presentation date!

Part B: Knowledge creation

The second part of this course deals with issues of knowledge creation in a highly interdisciplinary manner by  integrating students from two classes. It is designed as a theory-guided practical project work consisting of several phases which are described in detail in the sections below. These phases consist of face-2-face sessions, of project work which has to be done in teams (“knowledge creation teams”/KCTs), of team coaching sessions, as well as of a prototyping session. Furthermore, these KCTs have their virtual (WWW) project space where they communicate and share their findings, observations, new insights, questions, etc. There will be one external “retreat-like/outdoor” day outside the classroom where an alternative technique of knowledge creation will be experimented with. After a phase of prototyping the theoretical background and the experiences are reflected in the final phase.

These phases will be accompanied by the teachers in each step of the project work.

 

SE Design

 

 

Topics, dates, and locations

up

 

Part A: Philosophy of Science | Introduction

For PhD-students from the Vienna University of Technology the first meeting (Vorbesprechung) will be at March 4, 10.30-12.00 Uhr, Theresianumgasse 27, HS 2

 

unit
date/time location theme type of work

pro-

ject ID

deliverables
A1

March 4, 2013

15.00–17.00

HS 3, BWZ Brünnerstr. 72

Introduction & community building

  • Presentation of course design, contents, learning outcomes, etc.
  • Introduction of students and teachers
  • Selecting topics and forming of groups

f2f*

whole group

 

Register for this course

  • You have to register for participating in this course via this electronic form
A2

Coaching session:

March 13, 2013

10.30-12.00


Group1: 10.30

Group2: 11.00

Group3: 11.30

office M.Peschl (map)

Coaching & preparation for presentation

  • Groups bring their presentation concepts
  • Discussing, coaching and finalizing concepts

f2f

groupwise coaching

   
A3

March 20 , 2013

9.00–17.00

HS 13 (Fakultätslounge), BWZ Brünnerstr. 72

Foundations of (philosophy of) science

f2f

whole group

1

Presentation

  • Students are supposed to prepare a didactically elaborated presentation on their specific topic (in small groups)
  • Groups have to stick to the schedule
  • Requirements

* = face to face

 

Part B: Knowledge Creation

 

unit
date/time location theme type of work

pro-

ject

ID

project deliverables
B0

 

 

Phase 0: Questions that matter/matter(s) of concern | Link Details Link...

Each student has to reflect and think about a “question that really matters” to her/him (individually). The goal is to individually find a topic/question that deeply concerns the particular student (be it a scientific, social, personal, etc. question). In the following unit these questions/topics will be presented and they are the basis for establishing common emergent thematic fields.

personal study

2

Question(s) that matter(s)/matter(s) of concern

  • Mini-presentation of “question(s)/topic(s) that matters"
  • Link Details & WWW-Form
  • Deadline: 3 days prior to date of unit B1
B1

April 8, 2013

16.00-21.00

HS 1, 1040, Theresianumgasse 27, (TU Wien)

Phase 1: Identifying emerging thematic fields and co-initiating | Link Details Link...

  • emerging thematic fields will be identified
  • a newly developed knowledge technology being based on the reflection and identification of the participants´ core beliefs and base concepts/assumptions in their questions/interests is applied
  • knowledge creation teams (KCTs) will be formed around these emergent thematic fields

f2f

whole group

 

 

B2

 

 

Phase 2: Co-initiating KCTs, community-building, and observation strategy development | Link Details Link...

  • knowledge creation teams (KCTs) are supposed to sharpen their thematic field
  • team building
  • develop a sketch for an observation strategy

personal study and work in KCTs

3

Thematic field & observation strategy

Presentation of

  • thematic field
  • persons, places, etc. relevant for the thematic field
  • sketch of observation strategy
B3

Coaching session:

April 15, 2013

9.00-13.00


KCT2: 9.00

KCT3: 9.30

KCT4: 10.00

KCT5: 10.30

KCT6: 11.00

KCT6A: 11.30

HS 2i, NIG (= Neues Institutsgebäude, Universitätsstraße 7, 1010 [2.Stock])

Phase 3: Negotiating observation strategy & observation design | Link Details Link...

  • each KCT presents its elaborated thematic field and observation strategy/design
  • develop a concrete observation design

f2f group coaching

in KCTs (each group)

   

B4

   

Phase 4: Deep observation & deep understanding | Link Details Link...

  • KCTs totally immerse into the chosen thematic field by exploring it with a variety of methods for deep observation
  • results have to be documented in a WWW/electronic form
personal study and work in KCTs 4

Deep observation

  • WWW-observation/project space with consolidated observational data + reflection
  • Written justification of the knowledge structure of your WWW-project space
  • Personal & group reflection
  • Link Details & WWW-Form
  • Deadline: 3 days prior to date of unit B5
B5

May 2, 2013

9.00–17.00

HS 2, 1040, Theresianumgasse 27, (TU Wien)

Phase 5: Creating collective sense organs and collective sense making | Link Details Link...

  • by sharing knowledge about the experiences in the process of observation the KCTs try to gain a rough and initial collective understanding of their observations and of what wants to emerge in their respective thematic fields
  • applied methods: world café and dialogue

f2f

whole group

   
B6

May 3, 2013

9.00–18.00

(alternative: May 8| 9-18, if weather is bad on first date)

 

outdoor location:

Lobau, Nationalpark Camp Lobau, Lobaustraße-Wien 1, 2301 Groß-Enzersdorf

 

Link Directions...

Phase 6: Presencing — Creating radically new knowledge | Link Details Link...

  • each participant enters into a space of creating new knowledge in an individual process of letting-go and emergence
  • reflection, silence, etc.
  • in this process of presencing (U-theory; Scharmer 2007, Senge et al. 2004) both radically new and at the same time “organically grown” knowledge emerges out of a profound understanding of the thematic field

f2f

whole group

5

Project idea

  • Written description of a joint project (idea) having emerged out of the processes of the presencing process:
    • 1-3 sentences sketching what the theme and intention of the project is
    • 2-4 questions which are driving this project
  • Put these deliverables in your WWW-project space
  • Link Details & WWW-Form
  • Deadline: 3 days after this unit (B6)
B7

Coaching session:

May 16, 2013

9.00–14.00


KCT2: 9.00

KCT3: 9.30

KCT4: 10.00

KCT5: 10.30

KCT6: 11.00

KCT6A: 11.30

office M.Peschl (map)

 

 

Phase 7: Crystallizing & prototyping | Link Details Link...

  • the resulting (still fragile) project idea from the phase of presencing is concretized in a period of self study and cooperative work in the KCTs
  • the KCT prototype the concrete project
  • a coaching session supports the process of prototyping
  • the prototypes are consolidated
  • students are invited to use different media and materials for realizing their prototypes

personal study and work in KCTs

+ f2f group coaching

in KCTs (each group)

6

Crystallizing & prototyping

  • Document the process of crystallizing and prototyping (written, photos, short videos, etc.)
  • Written description, designs, etc. of 1-4 prototypes + rough sketches of project plans (for coaching session)
  • prepare final presentation of prototype
  • Link Details

Post these deliverables in your WWW-project space

B8

June 11, 2013

9.00–13.30

HS 1, 1040, Theresianumgasse 27, (TU Wien)

Phase 8: Creating new realities | Link Details Link...

  • the final prototype/scenario is presented by KCTs
  • discussion of prototypes

f2f

whole group

7

Prototype

(Presentation of the) Prototype making explicit the core ideas of the developed project + an operational plan for realizing this project. This prototype has to fulfill the following criteria:

  • Originality (“radically new”)
  • Feasible and realizable
  • Use of different materials and media for presentation of prototype
  • Link Details & WWW-Form
  • Deadline: 3 days prior to date of unit B8
B9

June 11, 2013

13.30–18.00

HS 1, 1040, Theresianumgasse 27, (TU Wien)

Phase 9: Overspill, theoretical backgorund, and reflection | Link Details Link...

  • The theoretical background is presented and discussed
  • The "observation group" presents its observations and starts a final round of reflection

f2f

whole group

8

Learning journal

During this course students are supposed to do continuous (e-)portfolio/learning journal work documenting and reflecting their learnings, questions, experiences, etc. (e.g., in a blog, wiki, etc.). These blogs can be personal or public. At the end of the course each student has to send a link of his blog to the instructor.

 

 

 

 

 

Grading and academic honesty

up

Grading & assessment

 

ID project points
1 Presentation 15
2 Question that matters 5
3 Thematic field 10
4 Deep observation 15
5 Project idea 10
6 Crystallizing & Prototyping 15
7 Prototype 10
8 Learning journal 20

 

 

Learning journal

During this course students are supposed to do continuous (e-)portfolio work documenting and reflecting their learnings, questions, experiences, etc. (e.g., in a blog, wiki, etc.). These blogs can be personal or public. At the end of the course each student has to send a link of his blog to the instructor.

Here is list of links of free blog sites:

 

Final Grading

 

points
93-100
81-92
71-80
61-70
0-60
grade
sehr gut (1)
gut (2)
befriedigend (3)
genügend (4)
nicht genügend (5)

 

 

Academic honesty

You are expected to be familiar with university policies on plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty. By registering for this course/module you declare that all your work (presentations, submissions, papers, etc.) is your own work and that, to the best of your knowledge and belief, it contains no material previously published or written by another person nor material which to a substantial extent has been accepted for the award of any other degree or diploma at this or any other educational institution. In addition, you certify that all information sources and literature used are indicated in your work.

Plagiarism or cheating will result in a failing grade for this course; offenders may be subject to further administrative sanctions.

 

Contact

up

 

ao.Univ.Prof. Dr.DI Markus F. Peschl

You can find ao.Univ.Prof.Dr. Markus Peschl s here (map)

 

 

Dr. Martina Hartner

contact: martina.hartner@univie.ac.at

 

 


last update: Monday, 15-Apr-2013 11:39:49 CEST | version 1.4 up up
© M.F.Peschl Counter

site navigation:

Home/Syllabus

Registration

units: A3 Philosophy of science


units: B knowledge creation/pesencing

B0: Questions

B1: Emergent Fields

B2: Co-Initiating

B3: Negotiating Observation

B4: Deep Observation

B5: Creating Collective Sense Organs

B6: Presencing

B7: Crystallizing & Prototyping

B8: Creating New Realities

B9: Reflection & Theory

 

a Diretions to outdoor location

a TBA