SS 2013 | SE | 2Std. | LVA 390045 | http://www.univie.ac.at/knowledge/peschl/teaching/wthse2/phd_management/

PhD-M: Philosophy of Science

Foundations and Practicing Collaborative Knowledge Construction and Design Thinking in Science and Technology

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units: A3 Philosophy of science


units: B knowledge creation/pesencing

B0: Questions

B1: Emergent Fields

B2: Co-Initiating

B3: Negotiating Observation

B4: Deep Observation

B5: Creating Collective Sense Organs

B6: Presencing

B7: Crystallizing & Prototyping

B8: Creating New Realities

B9: Reflection & Theory

 

a Diretions to outdoor location

a TBA

 

ao.Univ.Prof.Dr. Markus F. Peschl

Gloria Bottaro

University of Vienna

> A3 Foundations of (philosophy of) science | Presentation session


page navigation: Contents | Detailed program | Requirements |


 

Contents

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Foundations of (philosophy of) science

 

In the first part of this course we explore what science is, what its goals are, what it does, how it works, what its limits are, and what are its basic assumptions about knowledge, methods, the world, etc. We take a closer look at the processes involved in developing scientific knowledge/models; we follow the path from the phenomenon of interest, via the processes of observation, measuring, interpreting data, applying statistical methods, forming hypotheses, constructing scientific models/theories, making predictions and experimental designs, and finally “manipulating” the phenomenon of interest in an experiment (or simulation). These knowledge processes are reflected from the perspective of your respective discipline and research questions. We will discover that it is not really clear what the epistemological status of the resulting (scientific) knowledge is and—as a consequence—we will have to question classical concepts of science, such as that science gives us a true and objective picture of the world, that science is independent of observer and cultural influences, etc. Alternative concepts, such as Kuhn’s scientific paradigms, the constructivist perspective, and others will be discussed as possible ways out.

 

Detailed program

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group
topic reference chapter/page remark duration
1
Foundations: Science, theories, models, causality, and explanations 2h
  Godfrey-Smith, P. (2003). Theory and reality. An introduction to the philosophy of science. Chicago; London: University of Chicago Press. pp 2–13 science and philosophy of science  
  Okasha, S. (2002). Philosophy of science. Oxford: Oxford University Press. chapters 1–3 science, scientific reasoning, and explanation  
  Kosso, P. (1992). Reading the book of nature. An introduction to the philosophy of science. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press. pp 8–26 (optional) theories  
2
Scientific knowledge and reality. From reality to theory (and back) 2h
  Chalmers, A.F. (1999). What is this thing called science? (third ed.). Berkshire, GB: Open University Press. chapters 2–3 observation & experiment  
  Popper, K.R. (1959). The logic of scientific discovery. London: Hutchinson. (optional) Popper & falsificationism  
  Chalmers, A.F. (1999). What is this thing called science? (third ed.). Berkshire, GB: Open University Press. chapters 5–6 (7) Popper & falsificationism  
  Okasha, S. (2002). Philosophy of science. Oxford: Oxford University Press. chapter 4 realism & antirealism  
  Godfrey-Smith, P. (2003). Theory and reality. An introduction to the philosophy of science. Chicago; London: University of Chicago Press. pp 155–162 (optional) theory-ladenness of observation  
  Kolb, D.A. (1984). Experiential learning: experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. pp 20–38 learning, erxperience, knowledge, and science  
3
Science as process: dynamics of scientific knowledge and its social embedding 2h
  Kuhn, T.S. (1970). The structure of scientific revolutions (second ed.). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.   Kuhn and scientific revolutions  
  Okasha, S. (2002). Philosophy of science. Oxford: Oxford University Press. chapter 5 Kuhn and scientific revolutions  
  Chalmers, A.F. (1999). What is this thing called science? (third ed.). Berkshire, GB: Open University Press. chapter 8 Kuhn and scientific revolutions  
  Godfrey-Smith, P. (2003). Theory and reality. An introduction to the philosophy of science. Chicago; London: University of Chicago Press. chapters 5 & 6 (optional) critical review of Kuhn  
  Godfrey-Smith, P. (2003). Theory and reality. An introduction to the philosophy of science. Chicago; London: University of Chicago Press. chapter 8 sociology of science  

 

 

Requirements

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Each group is responsible for designing a didactically demanding and appealing session in which the basic concepts and questions are presented and collaboratively worked on. Each session/group has to stick to its allocated time slots (see table above). This time includes all activities.

Your are supposed to present your work to the instructor(s) in advance (see schedule).

 

Requirements for presentation of above groups:

 


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site navigation:

Home/Syllabus

Registration

units: A3 Philosophy of science


units: B knowledge creation/pesencing

B0: Questions

B1: Emergent Fields

B2: Co-Initiating

B3: Negotiating Observation

B4: Deep Observation

B5: Creating Collective Sense Organs

B6: Presencing

B7: Crystallizing & Prototyping

B8: Creating New Realities

B9: Reflection & Theory

 

a Diretions to outdoor location

a TBA