visions of community, project team viscom, walter pohl, Francesco Borri, Gerda Heydemann, andre gingrich, Johann Heiss, Daniel Mahony, Helmut Krasser, Guntram Hazod, Mathias Fermer, Christina Lutter, Peter Gretzel, Maria Mair, Elisabeth Gruber, Martin Haltrich, Salvatore Liccardo, Maria Nezbeda, Veronika Wieser, Magdalena Kloss, Diarmuid Ó Riain, Christian Nikolaus Opitz, Barbara Schedl, Alexander O'Hara, Anne Regourd


Project Team

Last Update: 07.10.15

Project Leaders
    Walter Pohl
    Project Speaker

    Project Leader:
    Early Medieval
    Europe

    Andre Gingrich
    Deputy
    Project Speaker

    Project Leader:
    South Arabia

    Vincent Eltschinger

    Project Leader:
    Tibetan Empire

    Christina Lutter

    Project Leader:
    Late Medieval
    Central Europe

    Oliver Schmitt

    Project Leader:
    Late Medieval
    Dalmatia
     

    For more information about the individual project parts, please click on the tabs below

Early Medieval Europe
  • Walter Pohl
  • Francesco Borri
  • Gerda Heydemann
  • Salvatore Liccardo
  • Maria Nezbeda
  • Manu Radhakrishnan
  • Giorgia Vocino
  • Graeme Ward
  • Veronika Wieser

Project Leader   Project Speaker   cv    contact

Walter Pohl, Univ.-Prof. Dr.   Department of History (University of Vienna),
Institute for Medieval Research (AAS)

Walter Pohl is Professor of medieval history at the University of Vienna and director of the Institute for Medieval Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. He has also taught at Los Angeles (UCLA), Leiden, Budapest (CEU) and Ishevsk (Russia). He is fellow of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and was awarded the Wittgenstein Prize (2004) and the ERC Advanced Grant (2010). His fields of study cover the role of ethnicity and identity in late antiquity and the early middle ages, the tranformation of the Roman world and the development of the post-Roman kingdoms, early medieval historiography and its manuscript transmission, early medieval lawcodes, the history of the Eurasian steppe peoples and Italian cultural and political history until c. 1000 AD.

Selected books:

  • Die Awaren. Ein Steppenvolk in Mitteleuropa, 567-822 n.Chr. (München 1988, 2002, english translation forthcoming), 529 S.
  • Die Germanen (Enzyklopädie der deutschen Geschichte 57, München 2000, 22004), 160 S.
  • Le origini etniche dell’Europa. Barbari e Romani tra antichità e medioevo (Rom 2000), 325 S. Werkstätte der Erinnerung. Montecassino und die langobardische Vergangenheit (MIÖG Erg. Bd. 39, Wien 2001), 262 S.
  • Die Völkerwanderung. Eroberung und Integration (Stuttgart-Berlin-Köln 2002, 2005), 266 S.

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Francesco Borri, Dr. • Department of History (University of Vienna)

Francesco Borri researches the development of identities and narratives of origin in early Medieval Dalmatia and Italy, framing the identification discourse in the broader history of society, communications and political structures. He studied medieval history and archaeology at the Ca´ Foscari University of Venice, where he completed also his doctoral research working on a dissertation on early Medieval Adriatic. During and after his Ph.D. studies he worked and researched in Germany, England, Austria and the United States. Since 2009, he works in Vienna where he has been junior researcher in the FWF-Wittgenstein-project „Ethnic Identities in Early Medieval Europe”. Within VisCom he is now working on the traditions on King Alboin’s death and the role of social memory in the Lombard kingdom between 600 and 900. Mr. Borri is also planning a monograph on early Medieval Dalmatia (400 – 1000)

Selected Publications:

  • Gli Istriani e i loro parenti. Φράγγοι, Romani e Slavi nella periferia di Bisanzio, in: Jahrbuch der Österreichischen Byzantinistik 60 (2010) 1-25.

  • White Croatia and the Arrival of the Croats: An Interpretation of Constantine Porphyrogenitus on the Oldest Dalmatian History’, in: Early Medieval Europe 19 (2011) 204-231.

  • Murder by Death: Alboin's life, end(s), and means, in: Millennium 8 (2011) 223-270

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Gerda Heydemann, Dr.   Institute for Medieval Research (AAS)

Gerda Heydemann’s research concentrates on how the Bible, in particular the Old Testament, contributed to the formation and legitimation of a new political order in the post-Roman kingdoms in the Latin West. Within VISCOM, she focuses on "Scripts for Community – Ethnic and Political Models in Early Medieval Biblical Exegesis", studying biblical exegesis in order to see how early medieval readers used the Bible as a tool to develop visions of community and to make sense of their own present. Her PhD thesis on Ethnicity and Religion in the Early Middle Ages: Exegesis of Identity in Cassiodorus’ Psalm Commentary was completed in June 2013 (advisor: Walter Pohl), and she is currently revising it for publication. A special area of interest lies in the language of community used in exegetical texts (esp. terminology related to peoples and political entities, such as populus, gens, natio, civitas, etc.), and in the connection between religious, ethnic and political discourses about community. This is especially fruitful to study from a comparative angle, in particular in collaboration with VISCOM scholars working on the Islamic tradition.
She has studied History and Political Science at the Universities of Vienna (MA in 2005) and Utrecht (Erasmus Scholarship in 2003/04). She has held a PhD scholarship at the Institute for Medieval Research (Austrian Academy of Sciences) between 2008 and 2011, and has been a junior researcher in the FWF-Wittgenstein-project Ethnic Identities in Early Medieval Europe (2005-2011). In 2010-2011, she was a Visiting Student Research Collaborator at Princeton University.

Publications:

  • Biblical Israel and the Christian gentes: Social metaphors and concepts of community in Cassiodorus’ Expositio psalmorum, in: Strategies of Identification: Ethnicity and Religion in Early Medieval Europe, Cultural Encounters in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages 13, Turnhout, Brepols: 2013) 98-141.

  • (ed. with Walter Pohl): Post-Roman Transitions: Christian and Barbarian Identities in the Early Medieval West, Cultural Encounters in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages 14 (Turnhout, Brepols: 2013).

  • (ed. mit Walter Pohl): Strategies of Identification: Ethnicity and Religion in Early Medieval Europe, Cultural Encounters in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages 13, (Turnhout, Brepols: 2013)

  • Text und Translation. Strategien zur Mobilisierung spiritueller Ressourcen im Frankenreich Ludwigs des Frommen, in: Zwischen Niederschrift und Wiederschrift. Frühmittelalterliche Hagiographie und Historiographie im Spannungsfeld von Konpendienüberlieferung und Editionstechnik, ed. Richard Corradini/Maximilian Diesenberger (Forschungen zur Geschichte des Mittelalters 15, Vienna 2010) 301-334.

  • Relics and texts: hagiography and authority in ninth-century Francia, in: An Age of Saints? Power, Conflict and Dissent in Early Medieval Christianity, AD 300–900, ed. Peter Sarris/Matthew dal Santo/Phil Boot (Brill’s Series on the Early Middle Ages 20, Leiden/Boston 2011) 187-204.

  • Zur Gestaltung der Rolle Brunhildes in merowingischer Historiographie, in: Texts and Identities in the Early Middle Ages, ed. Richard Corradini/Rob Meens/Christina Pössel/ Philip Shaw (Forschungen zur Geschichte des Mittelalters 12, Vienna 2006) 73–85.

  • Heiligen aan de wandel. Martelaren uit de Romeinse catacombe Inter duas lauros in het Frankenrijk, in: Millenium. Tijdschrift voor Middeleeuwse Studies 18 (2004) 3–28.

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Salvatore Liccardo, Mag. • Department of History (University of Vienna)

Liccardo has studied History at the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. His Bachelor thesis was about the migration of the Visigoths, between the end of the 4th century and the beginning of the 5th century, and their settlement in Aquitania in 418 A.D. During his Master he spent a semester at the Universität Wien as Erasmus student to increase his knowledge of Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages. In order to examine in depth the transformation of the Roman world, he choose as main theme of his Master thesis the socio-political and cultural role played by the bishops between the 4th and the 6th century Salvatore in the Mediterranean area, with a focus on North Africa and Gaul. During the Wintersemester 2012/2013 he attended two seminars at the Freie Universität Berlin to analyse the relationships between the episcopal authorities and the popular movements, such as the Donatism and the Bagaudae, which perturbed the social order during the Late Antiquity. In February 2013 he graduated cum laude. His research interests include the ethnical interactions between Roman and Barbaric communities, the gradual formation of the national identities in Early Medieval Europe and the social role assumed by the ecclesiastical institutions during the last centuries of the Roman empire and after.

Project Investigator   cv    contact

Maria Nezbeda, Mag. • Department of History (University of Vienna)

Maria Nezbeda’s research focuses on the transformation of the Roman world and the role of ethnicity and identity in Late Antiquity and early Middle Ages. She received her MA in History at Vienna University in 2013. During her studies she worked on barbarian topoi and the function/position of barbarians in the Roman army. Currently, she is working on her PhD thesis under prof. Walter Pohl. Within VISCOM, she focuses on kinship in the context of ethnic processes in tribal societies on the basis of antique historiography, in particular Ammianus Marcellinus, Jordanes and Procopius of Caesarea.

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Manu Radhakrishnan, PhD • Department of History (University of Vienna) 

Manu Radhakrishnan studied Economics at Harvard and History first at the Graduate Centre of the City University of New York (MA 2006) and then at Princeton University (MA 2006, PhD 2012). He has been working at the Institute for Medieval Studies (Austrian Academy of Sciences) since 2012 and has been a researcher in the ERC Starting Grant OVerMode. His research centres on Late Antique Latin monastic hagiography (the Liber vitas patrum collection of stories of the desert fathers and mothers of Egypt) and its late medieval vernacular lay reception, primarily in Italy. He is working on the Latin hagiographical dossier of the Egyptian hermit Onuphrius, the last of the desert parents to be introduced to the West, as well as the Legendarium Austriacum Minus, a late medieval Latin legendary that circulated primarily in Austria and southern Germany. He enjoys working with unedited manuscripts.

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Giorgia Vocino, PhD • Institute for Medieval Research (AAS)

Giorgia Vocino carried out her PhD project between the University Ca’ Foscari of Venice and the École Pratique des Hautes Études of Paris (2006-2010). After obtaining a Rubicon Grant (co-funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research and the Marie Curie Actions) she was appointed a post-doctoral research fellow in the Department of History and Art History at the University of Utrecht (2011-2013). She joined the Institute for Medieval Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in October 2013. Vocino's present research focuses on the competition between various important episcopal churches in Carolingian-dominated Italy, through an analysis of the hagiography written within this context. As a supplementary research project, she has also started to work on early medieval Roman hagiography (7th-9th century) and episcopal identities, representation and self-fashioning in early medieval Italy. The overarching theme in her research centers on the transmission of classical and late antique literature in the early Middle Ages, a phenomenon that is particularly prominent and well-documented in the Italian peninsula.

Selected Publications:

  • Under the aegis of the saints. Hagiography and Power in early Carolingian northern Italy, Early Medieval Europe 22/1 (2014), 26-52.
  • “Triginta autem Brixienses sunt episcopi quos meminimus”. Mémoire épiscopale et hagiographie à l’époque carolingienne: le dossier de saint Filastre évêque de Brescia, in Rerum gestarum scriptor. Histoire et historiographie au Moyen Âge , eds. M. Coumert, M.-C. Isaïa, K. Krönert and S. Shimahara (PUPS: Paris, 2012) 313-328.
  • Hagiography as an instrument for political claims in the Carolingian Northern Italy: the Saint Syrus dossier (BHL 7976 and 7978), in An Age of Saints? Power, Conflict and Dissent in Early Medieval Christianity, eds. P. Booth, M. Dal Santo and P. Sarris (Brill: Leiden 2011) 169-186.
  • Haut Moyen Âge, in Dictionnaire des Concepts Nomades en Sciences Humaines, ed. O. Christin, (Editions Metailié: Paris 2010) 189-201. Le traslazioni di reliquie in età carolingia (fine VIII-IX secolo): uno studio comparativo, Rivista di Storia e Letteratura Religiosa, XLIV (2008), 207-255.

Associate Project Investigator   cv   contact

Graeme Ward, PhD  •  Institute for Medieval Research (AAS)

Graeme Ward studied history at the University of Glasgow, before beginning his doctoral research at the University of Cambridge, which he completed in July 2014. His PhD thesis focused on the structure and emphases of the universal history written by Frechulf of Lisieux in c. 830, as well as the cultural and intellectual contexts which shaped Frechulf’s work. Broadly speaking, Graeme’s current research seeks to explore the intersections between historiography and biblical studies in the early medieval west; more particularly, he is interested in the transmission and reception of late antique historical texts in the Carolingian world.

Publications
  • (with Rosamond McKitterick) The knowledge of Jewish history in the early Middle Ages, in: Barbarians and Jews in the early Middle Ages, eds. Yitzhak Hen, Ora Limor, Thomas F.X. Noble, (Brepols: Turnhout, forthcoming)
  • Lessons in leadership: Constantine and Theodosius in Frechulf’s Histories, in: Cultural Memory and the Resources of the Past, eds. Rosamond McKitterick, Sven Meeder, and Clemens Gantner (CUP: Cambridge, 2015)
  • All roads lead to Rome? Frechulf of Lisieux, Augustine and Orosius, Early Medieval Europe (2014)

 

Project Investigator   Coordinator   cv    contact

Veronika Wieser, Mag.   Department of History (University of Vienna) 

Veronika Wieser has studied History, Classics and Political Science at the University of Vienna (MA in 2006). She has been working at the Institute for Medieval Studies (Austrian Academy of Sciences) since 2003 and has been a junior researcher in the FWF-Wittgenstein-project „Ethnic Identities in Early Medieval Europe“ (2005-2011). She has held a PhD-scholarship at the Institute for Medieval Research between 2009-2013 which was carried out in line with an interdisciplinary research project on Western Apocalypticism and in cooperation with the Institute of History, the Department for German Studies and the Department of Communication at the University of Vienna. In 2010, she was Honorary Research Fellow at the Department for History/ Medieval Area at the University of Glasgow and in 2012, she was Visiting Scholar at the Friedrich-Meinecke Institut, Freie Universität Berlin. Her research concentrates on late antique and early medieval historiography, late antique chronology and geography, and apocalyptic narratives. Within the VISCOM research framework, she is currently finishing her PhD-thesis on the formation of an eschatological discourse in Late Antiquity and the construction of political and religious communities of the End-times. In addition, she shares responsibility for the coordination of the project.

Publications:

  • Roms wilde Völker. Grenzüberschreitungen und Untergangsstimm(ung)en im letzten Jahrhundert des römischen Imperiums, in: Rebekka Voss, Wolfram Brandes, Felicitas Schmieder (ed.), Völker der Endzeit. Apokalyptische Vorstellungen und politische Szenarien (forthcoming Berlin 2014).

  •  (ed. with Christian Zolles, Catherine Feik Martin Zolles, Leo Schlöndorff), Abendländische Apokalyptik. Kompendium zur Genealogie der Endzeit (Kulturgeschichte der Apokalypse 1, Berlin 2013).

  • Die Weltchronik des Sulpicius Severus. Fragmente einer Sprache der Endzeit im ausgehenden 4. Jahrhundert, in: Veronika Wieser, Christian Zolles, Catherine Feik, Martin Zolles, Leo Schlöndorff (Hg.), Abendländische Apokalyptik. Kompendium zur Genealogie der Endzeit (Akademieverlag Berlin 2013).

  •  (with Christian Zolles/Martin Zolles), Einleitung, in: Abendländische Apokalyptik. Kompendium zur Genealogie der Endzeit Kulturgeschichte der Apokalypse 1, Berlin 2013)

  • (ed. with Walter Pohl), Der frühmittelalterliche Staat – europäische Perspektiven (Forschungen zur Geschichte des Mittelalters 16, Wien 2009)
South Arabia
  • Andre Gingrich
  • Johann Heiss
  • Eirik Hovden
  • Magdalena Kloss
  • Odile Kommer
  • Daniel Mahoney

Project Leader   Deputy Project Speaker    cv    contact

Andre Gingrich, Univ.-Prof. Dr.   Institute for Social Anthropology (AAS)

Since 2003, Andre Gingrich is Director of the Institute for Social Anthropology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and Professor of the Department of Social and Cultural Studies of the University of Vienna. He finished both his Doctoral Studies in Social Anthropology (as well as Sociology and Middle Eastern Studies) and his habilitation (1990) at the University of Vienna. His research focuses on the anthropology and history of south-western Arabia (Saudi Arabia and Yemen); Theories and Methods in Anthropology; and the History of Anthropology. Currently, he is Research project director at the Austrian Academy (e.g. Wittgenstein project 2001-2007; EU Tempus cooperation with BirZeit (2005-2009); Globalisation handbook (2006-2011, in German)), and holds several international functions: he is editorial board member for peer reviewed journals American Anthropologist (US), Ethnos (Sweden), Focaal (Nethelands); ERC panel chair SH2. For the VISCOM SFB, of which he is also the deputy director, his project focuses on south-western Arabia, and especially on medieval Yemeni communal relations.

Project Investigator    cv    contact

Johann Heiss, Dr.   Institute for Social Anthropology (AAS)

Johann Heiss is Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter at the Institute for Social Anthropology of the Austrian Academy of Science, and member of the VISCOM Project Part dealing with "South Arabia between Late Antiquity and and Early Modernity", where he focuses on religious and political developments in Yemen between the 10th and the 14th centuries as well as on the early views on tribal organization in southern Arabia in Byzantine and early Arabic literature. He finished his PhD Thesis on "Tribale Selbstorganisation und Konfliktregelung. Der Norden des Jemen zur Zeit des ersten Imams (10. Jh.)" in 1998, and has since then participated, amongst others, in the Wittgenstein Project "Lokale Identitäten und Überlokale Einflüsse" under prof. Andre Gingrich. Apart from his work for VISCOM, Johan Heiss currently studies the visible impact of the Ottoman Conquest of Central Europe, and is also interested in the development of social networks, the perception of "The Other" through the ages, and cultural contacts between Europe and the near East in the High Middle Ages.

Project Investigator    cv    contact

Eirik Hovden, Dr.   Institute for Social Anthropology (AAS)

Eirik Hovden's research interests are geography, history and ethnography of Yemen, Islamic (Zaydi) law, religious endowments (waqf), local water management and forms of local knowledge employed in management of common resources and infrastructure. From January 2012 he is part of the VISCOM project focusing on the Medieval period of north western Yemen (around 900-1550 CE). In 2004 he completed his Bachelor's degree (Cand. Mag.) with the combination of Geography, Social Anthropology and Arabic. in In 2006 Eirik Hovden submitted his M. A. thesis at the University of Bergen, Norway, at the interdisciplinary master program "Water studies". The thesis is an ethnography of contemporary, rural, traditional water management in the north-western mountains of Yemen.  In 2006-2007 he worked as an assistant at the Nile Basin Research Programme and in 2007-2011 he completed his PhD dissertation (waiting for the defense, Spring 2012). For the PhD fellowship he was connected to the Centre for Middle Easter Studies (SMI) and the Department of Archaeology, History and Studies of Religion and Culture (AHKR) at the University of Bergen. The supervisors are Prof. Knut Vikør and Associate Prof. Anne Bang. The topic for the PhD thesis is  the administration and jurisprudence of religious endowments (waqf, awqāf) in Yemen and how the Zaydi Islamic law of waqf relates to local practices. 

Project Investigator    cv    contact

Magdalena Kloss, Mag.   Institute for Social Anthropology (AAS)

Magdalena Kloss joined the VISCOM team in May 2013 and is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Vienna. Her research focuses on minorities and social groups in Southern and coastal Yemen in the late medieval to early modern period.

She holds a master's degree in cultural and social anthropology from the University of Vienna, where she wrote her thesis on concepts of masculinity among Muslim youth in Vienna. She also completed an MA in anthropology and development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her M.Sc. thesis analyzed a concept of community development utilized in Yemen by drawing upon ethnographic material on the social construction of public space and public interaction in Yemen. She is the founder of worldwise development, an online database facilitating cooperation between anthropologists and development practitioners.

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Odile Kommer, Mag.   Institute for Social Anthropology (AAS)

Project Investigator   cv    contact

Daniel Mahoney, Dr.   Institute for Social Anthropology (AAS)

Daniel Mahoney received his B.S. in Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison before starting his graduate studies in the department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago where he has focused on the history and archaeology of South Arabia.  In his dissertation research he incorporates texts, architecture and material culture in order to study the tribal communities of Dhamar Basin in the central highlands of Yemen during the Islamic period.  His research interests include historical anthropology, landscape archaeology and medieval Arabia.   

Tibetan Empire
  • Vincent Eltschinger
  • Francesco Bianchini
  • Guntram Hazod
  • Mathias Fermer
  • Reinier Langelaar
  • Nina Mirnig
  • Hou Hoaran
  • Helmut Krasser †

Project Leader   cv   contact

Vincent Eltschinger, Doz. Dr.   Institute for Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia (AAS)

Dr. Vincent Eltschinger (born 1970) has been a research fellow at the Institute for the Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia (Austrian Academy of Sciences) since 2003 and currently holds the position of interim director of this institution. His main research interests are late Indian Buddhist philosophy and scholasticism, which he has been investigating with regard to both its socio-religious background (e.g., apocalyptic expectations, competition for patronage) and its intellectual genealogy (including the works of the poet Aśvaghoṣa). Besides numerous articles, he has authored and co-edited several books, the most recent one being his habilitation thesis Buddhist Epistemology as Apologetics (Vienna, 2014). Dr. Eltschinger has taught in Lausanne (where he completed his PhD thesis in 2003), Zürich, Vienna, Paris, Budapest, Leiden and Leipzig; he was also awarded a research fellowship at Ryūkoku University (Kyōto, 2009).

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Francesco Bianchini

Project Investigator   cv    contact

Guntram Hazod, Doz. Dr.   Institute for Social Anthropology (AAS)

Guntram Hazod is social anthropologist, trained at the University of Vienna. After years of research activities in the framework of various projects at the Austrian Academy of Sciences (1992-1999) and at the University of Leipzig (2000-2006), since 2006 he has been working as a research associate at the Institute for Social Anthropology (ISA) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. Since 1993, he has regularly been going on field research in Tibet. His research interests include historical anthropology, ethno-archaeology and anthropology of landscape in Tibet and the Himalayas. He is the co-author of several monographs and author of a number of contributions in the field of history and historical anthropology of early and medieval Tibet. Currently he is leading two research projects at the ISA, both funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF).

Publications

  • 2006:
    (Co-edited with Andre Gingrich): Andre Gingrich und Guntram Hazod (Hg.), Der Rand und die Mitte. Beiträge zur Sozialanthropologie und Kulturgeschichte Tibets und des Himalaya, Wien: Verlag der ÖAW, vi + 301 pp.

  • 2007:
    (Co-authored with Per K. Sørensen): Sørensen, P.K. and Guntram Hazod, in cooperation with Tsering Gyalbo, Rulers on the Celestial Plain. Ecclesiastic and Secular Hegemony in Medieval Tibet. A Study of Tshal Gung-thang. 2 Vols. Wien: Verlag der ÖAW, ix + 1011 pp.

  • In press (2011):
    Tribal Mobility and Religious Fixation. Remarks on territorial transformation, social integration and identity in imperial and early post-imperial Tibet, in: Pohl, Walter and Clemens Gantner (ed.), Visions of Community (forthcoming 2011, Vienna).

  • Geschichte in der Landschaft. Zur Methode der historisch anthropologischen Forschung in Tibet, Working papers in Social Anthropology Vol. 12, S. 1–12 (www.oeaw.ac.at/sozant).

Project Investigator   cv    contact

Mathias Fermer, Mag.   Institute for Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia (AAS)

Mathias Fermer received his M.A. in Tibetology and Classic Indology from the Department of Indian and Tibetan Studies, University of Hamburg, in 2009. His M.A. thesis, entitled The Life and Works of Gong dkar rDo rje gdan pa Kun dga' rnam rgyal (1432-1496), is dedicated to the founder of a little-known monastic tradition that is part of the Sakyapa order of Tibetan Buddhism. He joined VISCOM in March 2011. Since then he has been working as a doctoral fellow at the Institute for the Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia (IKGA) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (AAS). His research interests include Tibetan religious history of the post-imperial period (from the 11th cent.), particularly the traditions within the Sakya sect, as well as Tibetan Buddhist painting traditions and various aspects of colloquial Tibetan. The research for his dissertation is focused on the formation and influence of Sakya monastic communities, as well as the process of community building among these institutions, in Southern Central Tibet (present-day Lhoka) from the middle of the 14th to the late 15th century, covering the hegemonic period of the Phagmodrupa clan (1354-1480).

Project Investigator   cv    contact

Reinier Langelaar, BA   Institute for the Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia (AAS)

Reinier Langelaar's research takes an ethno-historical approach towards kinship, genealogy, origin stories, and social organization on the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. His MA thesis is titled “Clans of Reb-gong? The Tsho-ba of a Tibetan Agricultural Village” and focuses on local social subdivisions known as tsho-ba, addressing their internal make-up and tactics of social perpetuation. Methodologically, the work incorporates both fieldwork and broader historical sources. He is working on related publications in the framework of VISCOM, using local texts to address the origins and representations of these groups and their wider communities. Specific interest goes out to those narratives that seek to tie the origins of local populations to the old Empire or to famous Buddhist teachers. A related area of focus regards the friction and interplay between such abstract narratives of descent and territorial underpinnings of local identity.

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Nina Mirnig, Dr.   Institute for the Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia (AAS)

Nina Mirnig received her M.St. (2005) and D.Phil. (2010) in Oriental Studies/Sanskrit from the Oriental Institute at Oxford University, with her thesis Liberating the Liberated. A History of the Development of Cremation and Ancestor Worship in the Early Śaiva Siddhānta under the supervision of Alexis Sanderson. After completing her doctorate, she took up a three-year Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the Institute of Indian Studies at the University of Groningen in the NWO-funded project A Historical Enquiry Concerning the Composition and Spread of the Skandapurāṇa (Project Coordinator: Hans Bakker), where she contributed to the editorial work and focused on the emergence and development of early Śaivism in the Kathmandu Valley based on epigraphical sources. She has also been awarded a Jan Gonda Fellowship by the Jan Gonda Fund Foundation at the Dutch Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences (October 2013-January 2014) and currently collaborates with the Sanskrit Manuscripts Project, Cambridge (Project Coordinator: Vincenzo Vergiani). She joined VISCOM and the Institute for the Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia (IKGA) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (AAS) in June 2014 to continue her work on early Śaiva religious and social history by preparing her thesis for publication and co-organizing the VISCOM conference Tantric Communities in Context: Sacred Secrets and Public Rituals.

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Hou Hoaran   MA

Project Leader   cv 

Helmut Krasser, Doz. Dr. († 2014)   Institute for Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia (AAS)

Helmut Krasser was Director of the Institute for the Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and Lecturer at the Institute for Tibetology and Buddhist Studies (from 2001: Institute for South-Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies) of the University of Vienna, as well as Vice-chairman of the Arbeitskreis für tibetische und buddhistische Studien, also at the University of Vienna. As researcher, he was involved in several FWF-projects covering the Cultural History of the Western Himalaya from the 8th Century, Religion and Philosophy in Brahmananical Orthodoxy, Tradition and transformation in Indian and Buddhist logic, and Buddhist Literature in Context. Aditionally, he was the (co-)editor of both the Wiener Studien zur Tibetologie und Buddhismuskunde, and the Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies.

Late Medieval Central Europe
  • Christina Lutter
  • Diarmuid Ó Riain
  • Elisabeth Gruber
  • Martin Haltrich
  • Christian Optitz
  • Barbara Schedl 

Project Leader    cv    contact 

Christina Lutter, Univ.-Prof. Dr. • Department of History (University of Vienna)

Christina Lutter is Professor at the History Department, University of Vienna and PI of the research project Social and Cultural Communities in Medieval Central Europe. She holds a PhD from the Univ. of Vienna. Her habilitation on Geschlecht & Wissen. Monastische Reformgemeinschaften im 12. Jahrhundert (Vienna: Oldenbourg 2005) won several prices. From 1994 to 2007 she worked at the Austrian Ministry of Science and Research, first in programme management, later as Deputy Head and Head of the Dept. of Humanities and Social Sciences. She is co-editor of the Zeitschrift für Kulturwissenschaften (ZfK, Bielefeld, transcript) and member of the editorial board of Cultural Studies (NY; London: Routledge). Her research foci and interests relating to the VISCOM-Project on Social and Cultural Communities across Medieval Monastic, Urban, and Courtly Cultures, include Medieval and Early Modern Cultural and Gender History; Cultural Theory and Cultural Studies and Gender Studies.

Recent VISCOM-related publications include:

  • With Andre Gingrich, Visions of Community. Comparative Approaches to Medieval Forms of Identity in Europe and Asia (History and Anthropology, Thematic Journal Issue 2014).
  • Forthcoming: with Walter Pohl and Eirik Hovden, Meanings of Community across Eurasia (Visions of Community, vol. 1, Leiden: Brill 2015).
  • Social Groups, Personal Relations, and the Making of Communities in Medieval vita monastica, in: Jörg Rogge et al. (Hg.), Making Sense as Cultural Practice. Historical perspectives (Mainzer Historische Kulturwissenschaften, Bielefeld: Transcript 2013), 45-61
  • Zwischen Hof und Kloster. Kulturelle Gemeinschaften im mittelalterlichen Österreich, Vienna: Böhlau 2010.

Project Investigator   cv   contact

Diarmuid Ó Riain, Dr.   Department of History (University of Vienna)

Diarmuid Ó Riain studied Law and German (BCL 2000) and Archaeology (HDip 2002) at University College Cork, before undertaking a doctorate in the School of Archaeology at University College Dublin (PhD 2009). His doctoral research concerned the history and architecture of the Irish Benedictine monasteries of medieval Germany (“Schottenklöster”). His research interests include the history of Irish monastic activity in Europe, the transmission of Irish texts on the Continent, and hagiographical studies in general.

Diarmuid commenced work on the VISCOM sub-project “Hagiography and monastic networks” in February 2013. His research primarily concerns the Magnum Legendarium Austriacum and other related hagiographical collections from central Europe, their transmission and social context.

Recent Publications

  • The Schottenklöster in the world: identity, independence and integration, in W. Pohl, C. Lutter and E. Hovden (eds), Meanings of community across medieval Eurasia (Brill, forthcoming).

  • “Et duxerunt in consuetudinem omnes Scoti ab illo die invisere loca sancta Christi et peregrinari”: the Schottenklöster and the legacy of the early Irish missionaries to the Continent, in W. Keller & D. Schlüter (eds) "A fantastic and abstruse Latinity": Hiberno-Continental Cultural and Literary Interactions in the Middle Ages (Nodus, forthcoming).

  • The Magnum Legendarium Austriacum: a new investigation of one of medieval Europe's richest hagiographical collections, in Analecta Bollandiana 133 (2015), pp. 87-165.

  • "Excellentissimi sanctorum Hibernie". Irish saints' lives in Austrian legendaries, in S. Ryan (ed.) Treasures of Irish Christianity 3: to the ends of the earth (Dublin, 2015).

 

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Elisabeth Gruber, MMag. Dr.   Department of History (University of Vienna), Without FWF-Funding

Elisabeth Gruber studied History and German Studies at the University of Salzburg. Her dissertation dealt with urban public building in the late Middle Ages in Austria. Since 2009 she is member of the Institute of Austrian History Research and Senior Scientist (PostDoc) at the University of Vienna with a focus on Austrian history. Her research interests are urban history, municipal economic and administrative structures in the late Middle Ages with a focus on the civic elites in the Austrian duchy and the Bohemian kingdom. Currently she works on a habilitation project investigating the role and quality of personal and institutional relationships within and between central European small urban structures in the late Middle Ages.

Publications relating to VISCOM:

  • Memoria – bürgerliches Selbstverständnis im späten Mittelalter und in der frühen Neuzeit am Beispiel Freistadt, in: Stadtkultur - Kultur(haupt)stadt. Hrsg. von Ferdinand Opll und Walter Schuster. Linz 2011. (in Druck)
  • Kleinstädtische Eliten im Land ob der Enns: Freistadt – Wels – Enns im 15. Jahrhundert, in: Mestne elite v srednjem in zgodnjem novem veku med Alpami, Jadranom in Panonsko nižino / Urban Elites in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Times between the Alps, the Adriatic and the Pannonian Plain, herausgegeben von Janez Mlinar und Bojan Balkovec. Zbirka Zgodovinskega časopisa 42, 132 – 147. (in Druck).
  • Die landesfürstliche Stadt Freistadt/Oberösterreich und ihre Beziehungen zu Krakau vom 15. bis zum 17. Jahrhundert, in: Die politische Elite Krakaus und ihre Beziehungen zu anderen europäischen Städten im Mittelalter und in der Neuzeit, Beitragsband (Krakau 2009). (in Druck)

  Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Martin Haltrich, MMag. Dr. Stiftsbibliothek Klosterneuburg, Without FWF-Funding

Martin Haltrich studied German Studies and History at the University of Vienna. His doctoral thesis dealt with late-medieval writing and practices of administration in the Chartusian monastery of Gaming (Lower Austria). He was librarian and archivist at the monasteries of Melk and Zwettl, at present he is head of the library in Klosterneuburg monastery. His research interests involve paleographical and codicological analyses of medieval manuscripts and late medieval administrative source material. Currently he is working on personal and institutional relationships between medieval Central European monasteries. 

Projects and Publications relating to VISCOM:

  • Carolingian manuscripts in Austrian libraries. Compilation of a palaeographic online-database following the insights and analyses of Bernhard Bischoff

  • Mittelalterliche Handschriften in österreichischen Bibliotheken (www.manuscripta.at)

  • gGt pGcher und ander dinge. Untersuchungen von Schriftlichkeit, Administration und Buchproduktion in der spätmittelalterlichen Verwaltung der Kartause Gaming (phil.-Diss., Univ. Wien 2010).

  • gem. mit Elisabeth GRUBER und Maria STIEGLECKER, Möglichkeiten kodikologischer Analyse im Bereich Verwaltungsschriftgut am Beispiel der spätmittelalterlichen Handschriften aus dem Stadtarchiv Freistadt: ein Werkstattbericht, in: Mitteilungen des Oberösterreichischen Landesarchivs 22 (2011) 211-225.

  • Die deutsche Legende der heiligen Caecilia in Melk. Überlieferung und Edition (Dipl.-Arb., Wien 2002).

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Christian Nikolaus Opitz, Mag. • Department of History (University of Vienna)

Christian Opitz studied Art History and Romance Philology at the University of Vienna. He wrote his dissertation on secular wall paintings of the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries, and has also published articles on late medieval religious art. His research interests lie in the area of late medieval art but also include word and image studies and neo-medievalism from the 19th–21st centuries.

Publications relating to VISCOM:

  • Eine „chambre aux enfants“ auf Burg Runkelstein? Ein neuer Vorschlag zur Deutung der sogenannten „Badestube“, in: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte 71, 2008, pp. 467-480.

  • Die Wandmalereien im Turmzimmer der Kremser Gozzoburg. Ein herrschaftliches Bildprogramm des späten 13. Jahrhunderts, in: Österreichische Zeitschrift für Kunst und Denkmalpflege 62, 2008, pp. 588-602.

  • Weltbild – Bildräume – Gedächtnisbilder. Enzyklopädische Freskenzyklen in Repräsentationsräumen des 13.-15. Jahrhunderts, in: Weltbilder im Mittelalter – Perceptions of the World in the Middle Ages, ed. by. Philipp Billion et al., Bonn 2009, pp. 29-60.

  • Ein gemaltes Tagelied des 14. Jahrhunderts? Zur Ikonographie des Wandbilds aus dem Rinegg’schen Domherrenhof in Konstanz, in: Zeitschrift für deutsche Philologie 129, 2010, pp. 107-126.

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Barbara Schedl, Doz. Dr. •  Institute for Art History (University of Vienna), Without FWF-Funding

Barbara Schedl studied Art History at the University of Vienna. She was research collaborator at the Commission of Art History, Austrian Academy of Sciences (1993-2001), and at the Technical University of Darmstadt, as well as research assistant and project coordinator at the UCLA (2005-2009), and of numerous research projects and exhibitions related to medieval architecture.

Currently she is working on a research project “St. Stephen's in Vienna. The architecture of written sources”. The aim of the project - which is lead in close cooperation with the subproject VISCOM 06/05 “Representations of community in material culture”-  is to conduct a systematic examination of the written sources on the construction of St Stephen’s in Vienna. These sources will be subjected to a comprehensive analysis with regard, on the one hand, to the building history of the church, and, on the other, to contemporary perceptions of community during the construction period.

link. http://kunstgeschichte.univie.ac.at/forschung/st-stephan-in-wien-architektur-der-schriftquellen/
 

Monographs

  • Der Klosterplan von St. Gallen. Von der Gelehrtendiskussion zur Erfindung der Architekturzeichnung, forthcoming Böhlau 2011
  • Klosterleben und Stadtkultur im mittelalterlichen Wien. Zur Architektur religiöser Frauenkommunitäten (Forschungen und Beiträge zur Wiener Stadtgeschichte 51), Innsbruck-Wien-Bozen 2009
  • Der König und seine Klosterstiftung in der Stadt Tulln. Eine Selbstinszenierung Rudolfs I. im Herzogtum Österreich (Beiträge zur Kirchengeschichte Niederösterreichs 14, hg. Thomas Aigner, Geschichtliche Beilagen zum St. Pöltener Diözesanblatt 31, hg. Bischöfliches Ordinariat St. Pölten), St. Pölten 2004

Editor

  • Together with Michaela Kronberger, Ausstellungskatalog, Der Dombau von St. Stephan. Die Originalpläne aus dem Mittelalter, (370. Sonderausstellung des Wien Museums Wien Museum Karlsplatz 11. März - 21. August 2011) Wien 2011

Articles

  • Hof – Stadt – Kloster. Zu Funktions- und Gefühlsräumen mittelalterlicher Frauenklöster in Wien,
    in: Christina Lutter (hg.), Funktionsräume – Wahrnehmungsräume – Gefühlsräume. Mittelalterliche Lebensformen zwischen Kloster und Hof (Veröffentlichungen des Instituts für Ö. Geschichtsforschung 59) Wien: Böhlau 2011), 41-58.
  • Herzoghof und Frauenkloster. Repräsentative Bettelordensarchitektur im Herzogtum Österreich, in Heidemarie Specht und Ralph Andraschek-Holzer (Hgg.), Bettelorden in Mitteleuropa. Geschichte, Kunst und Spiritualität (Beiträge zur Geschichte Niederösterreichs 15), St. Pölten 2008, 433-448.
Late Medieval Dalmatia
  • Oliver Schmitt
  • Fabian Kümmeler
  • Ermanno Orlando
  • Konrad Petrovsky

Project Leader   cv    contact

Oliver Schmitt, Prof. Dr. Institute for Eastern European History (University of Vienna)

Oliver Schmitt is Professor of East European History and Head of the Department of East European History at the University of Vienna. Professor Schmitt previously taught in Munich and Berne and most recently as Professeur invité at the Collège de France in 2010, and is a full member of the Austrian Academy of the Sciences.

His research focuses on the social and economic history of South-Eastern Europe, in particular Late Medieval Balkan history and the history of the Venetian Stato da mar; Albanian history, including the history of the areas of Albanian settlement in Kosovo and Macedonia; Rumanian Fascism, in particular the social history of the Romanian ‘Legionary Movement’in the Interwar period.

 

Project Investigator cv  contact

Fabian Kümmeler, Mag. Institute for Eastern European History (University of Vienna)

Fabian Kümmeler studied Medieval and Modern History, Regional History of the Rhineland, and Musicology at the University of Bonn, Germany and at the University of Haifa, Israel. He wrote his master's thesis on the negotiations of the Peace of Westphalia. He then studied Peace and Security Studies at the University of Hamburg, Germany where he focused on the Balkans and Yemen as conflict regions.
His main research interests are currently Southeast European History in the Late Middle Ages, especially late medieval Dalmatia, and Early Modern European History.

 

 

Project Investigator   cv    contact

Ermanno Orlando 

Associate Project Investigator   cv    contact

Konrad Petrovszky, Dr.  Institute for Eastern European History (University of Vienna)

Project Coordination
  • Rutger Kramer
  • Veronika Wieser

Project Coordinator   cv  contact

Rutger Kramer, Dr. Institute for Medieval Research (AAS)

Rutger Kramer has studied French and English at the Hogeschool Maastricht, and History at Utrecht University. After finishing his M.Phil. thesis on the use of the Bible in early medieval Breton hagiography, he went to the Freie Universität Berlin to start writing his PhD thesis on Carolingian rulership and monastic reforms in the eighth and ninth centuries, as part of the project Hludowicus: Die Produktivität einer Krise, while also being part of the Texts and Identities-group operating from the Institut for Medieval Research in Vienna. In addition to finishing his thesis, he is responsible for the Coordination of Visions of Community. His research interests include early medieval monasticism, Carolingian hagiographical and other narrative sources, medieval Brittany, and, more generally, the formation of and interactions between individual communities and identities.

 

Project Investigator Coordinator cv  contact

Veronika Wieser, Mag. Department of History (University of Vienna) 

Veronika Wieser has studied History, Classics and Political Science at the University of Vienna (MA in 2006). She has been working at the Institute for Medieval Studies (Austrian Academy of Sciences) since 2003 and has been a junior researcher in the FWF-Wittgenstein-project „Ethnic Identities in Early Medieval Europe“ (2005-2011). She has held a PhD-scholarship at the Institute for Medieval Research between 2009-2013 which was carried out in line with an interdisciplinary research project on Western Apocalypticism and in cooperation with the Institute of History, the Department for German Studies and the Department of Communication at the University of Vienna. In 2010, she was Honorary Research Fellow at the Department for History/ Medieval Area at the University of Glasgow and in 2012, she was Visiting Scholar at the Friedrich-Meinecke Institut, Freie Universität Berlin. Her research concentrates on late antique and early medieval historiography, late antique chronology and geography, and apocalyptic narratives. Within the VISCOM research framework, she is currently finishing her PhD-thesis on the formation of an eschatological discourse in Late Antiquity and the construction of political and religious communities of the End-times. In addition, she shares responsibility for the coordination of the project.

Publications:

  • Roms wilde Völker. Grenzüberschreitungen und Untergangsstimm(ung)en im letzten Jahrhundert des römischen Imperiums, in: Rebekka Voss, Wolfram Brandes, Felicitas Schmieder (ed.), Völker der Endzeit. Apokalyptische Vorstellungen und politische Szenarien (forthcoming Berlin 2014).

  •  (ed. with Christian Zolles, Catherine Feik Martin Zolles, Leo Schlöndorff), Abendländische Apokalyptik. Kompendium zur Genealogie der Endzeit (Kulturgeschichte der Apokalypse 1, Berlin 2013).

  • Die Weltchronik des Sulpicius Severus. Fragmente einer Sprache der Endzeit im ausgehenden 4. Jahrhundert, in: Veronika Wieser, Christian Zolles, Catherine Feik, Martin Zolles, Leo Schlöndorff (Hg.), Abendländische Apokalyptik. Kompendium zur Genealogie der Endzeit (Akademieverlag Berlin 2013).

  •  (with Christian Zolles/Martin Zolles), Einleitung, in: Abendländische Apokalyptik. Kompendium zur Genealogie der Endzeit Kulturgeschichte der Apokalypse 1, Berlin 2013)

  • (ed. with Walter Pohl), Der frühmittelalterliche Staat – europäische Perspektiven (Forschungen zur Geschichte des Mittelalters 16, Wien 2009)
former project investigators
  • Sascha Attia
  • Ondrej Cikan
  • Peter Gretzel
  • Maria Mair
  • Alexander O'Hara
  • Sukanya Raisharma
  • Anne Regourd

Former Project Investigator cv  contact

Sascha Attia, Mag. • Institute for Eastern European History (University of Vienna)

Sascha Attia currently researches the urban societies of the dalmatian cities of Korčula (Curzola) and Split (Spalato) in the 15th and early 16th centuries. He studied History, Archaeology and Philosophy at the Universitiy of Vienna and at the Universities of Berne (Bern) and Fribourg (Freiburg), Switzerland. His dissertation entitled "Handel und Wirtschaft der Stadt Trogir nach der Mitte des 16. Jahrhunderts" (Trade and economy of the city of Trogir in the second half of the sixteenth centurs" dealt with export licences for sea trade from the Dalmatian city of Trogir (Traù).

Project Investigator cv contact

Ondřej Cikán, MA • Department of History (University of Vienna)

Ondřej Cikán MA, born 1985 in Prague, has lived in Vienna since 1991. His research concentrates on the Byzantine and ancient Greek novels. With his MA thesis he attempted to reconstruct the lost novel The Wonders beyond Thule by Antonios Diogenes, under the supervision of Georg Danek (Institut für klassische Philologie, Mittel- und Neulatein, University of Vienna). His PhD thesis, written under the supervision of Claudia Rapp (Institut für Byzantinistik und Neogräzistik, University of Vienna) is dedicated to the development of Byzantine novels, with special attention being given to the perception of strangers. During his studies he spent one year at the Charles University in Prague. Additionally, he works as writer and translator from the Czech. Among other works, he published the surrealistic and ancient-like novel Menandros und Thaïs (Vienna 2011).

Former Project Investigator • cv 

Peter Gretzel, Dr. • Institute for Austrian Historical Research (University of Vienna)

Peter Gretzel studied Catholic Theology and Historical Auxiliaries at the University of Vienna. Since 2004 he is member of the Institute of Austrian History Research. His dissertation at the Catholic Theological Faculty at the University of Vienna dealt with contemporary history of several monasteries in Lower Austria. From 2005 to 2009 he worked as librarian, manuscript specialist and archivist in the Cistercian Abbey Zwettl, Austria. 2009 - 2011 he collaborated as project employee of the research group at the Institute for Medieval Studies at the Austrian Academy of Sciences by registering charters issued by Emperor Frederic III. between 1483 and 1488. His research interests are Historical Auxiliaries, Codicology and Diplomatics of the late Middle Ages as well as Liturgy and Hagiography.

 

Publications

  • Regesten Kaiser Friedrichs III. (1440-1493). Nach Archiven und Bibliotheken geordnet. H. xx: Die Urkunden und Briefe des Österreichischen Staatsarchivs in Wien, Abt. Haus-, Hof- und Staatsarchiv: Allgemeine Urkundenreihe, Familienurkunden und Abschriftensammlungen (1483-1488), bearb. von Peter Gretzel - Wien (u.a.), expected 2012.

  • Der nationalsozialistische "Klostersturm" im Gau "Niederdonau" und die Geschicke nicht enteigneter Klöster am Beispiel des Zisterzienserstiftes Zwettl, Diss., Univ. Wien 2010, online: http://othes.univie.ac.at/9111/.

  • Die Urkunden des Zisterzienserklosters Säusenstein in Niederösterreich, 2006, online: http://www.monasterium.net.

  • Auswirkungen der NS-Herrschaft auf das Stift Zwettl. Bestandsaufnahme und Einschätzung, Univ. Wien, Staatsprüfungsarbeit am Institut für Österreichische Geschichtsforschung, 2004.

  • Gehorsam und Freiheit. Eine Untersuchung zur Lehre der Enzyklika "Veritatis splendor" über das Zueinander von Gehorsam und Freiheit, Dipl.-Arb., Wien 1998.

Presentations

Primary Sources at Your Fingertips: Exploring Medieval Austria, Germany, and Switzerland through Online Digital Resources. The Magnum Legendarium Austriacum: A Digital Edition on the Web at the 46th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo (USA), May 2011.

  Former Project Investigator cv  contact

Maria Mair, Mag. • Department of History (University of Vienna)

Maria Mair studied History, Gender studies and Cultural studies at the University of Vienna (2002-2009) and at the Humboldt University in Berlin (2005-2006). From 2007 to 2009 she worked at the Schwerpunkt für visuelle Zeit- und Kulturgeschichte at the Institute for Contemporary History at the University of Vienna (Head: Frank Stern). 2010 she graduated with a thesis on self-representations of religious women in the 12th century (title: “Selbst“-Repräsentationen in den Prologtexten des ‚Hortus Deliciarum‘ und ‚Liber Scivias‘. Zum Verhältnis von Selbst, Gemeinschaft und Geschlecht in hochmittelalterlichen „Wissens“-Texten“; supervisor: Christina Lutter). Within the VISCOM research framework, she is currently working on her PhD-thesis, which aims at analysing the symbolic and practical construction of ‘community’ in and by historiographical texts written in the duchies of Austria and Styria in the late 13th century (working title: [Visions of Community in late 13th Century Austrian Historiography]; supervisors: Christina Lutter, Walter Pohl). Her research interests include theories and methods of historiography, constructivist theories on identity, as well as cultural and gender history of the Middle Ages.

Publications

  • Together with Christina Lutter and Stefanie Kollmann: Einleitung (Introduction), in: Funktionsräume – Wahrnehmungsräume – Gefühlsräume. Mittelalterliche Lebensformen zwischen Hof und Kloster (Internationale Tagung, 24.-27. September 2009, Stift Admont; Veröffentlichungen des Instituts für Österreichische Geschichtsforschung, Wien: Böhlau 2011)

  • „Selbst“-Repräsentationen in den Prologtexten des ‚HortusDeliciarum‘ und ‚LiberScivias‘. Zum Verhältnis von Selbst, Gemeinschaft und Geschlecht in hochmittelalterlichen „Wissens“-Texten (Diplomarbeit an der Universität Wien, online: http://othes.univie.ac.at/8022/).

Presentations and workshops

  • Concepts of Community in late 13th Century Austrian Historiography. Presentation of the PhD project at the PhD Conference „Concepts, practices and narratives as tools of studying cultural history – Current research projects from the Later Middleages until the 19th century, Mainz (Germany), Sept. 2011.

  • „Visions of Community“ in late 13th Century Austrian Historiography. Presentation of the PhD project at the VIth Medieval Chronicles Conference, Pécs (Hungary), July 2011.

  • Feministische Theorien – Eine Einführung (translation: Feminist theories – an introduction), Workshop at the FrauenFrühlingsUni (Women’s Spring University) Salzburg (Austria), May 2008 (with Susanne Kimm)

Former Project Investigator • cv  • contact

Alexander O'Hara, PhD. • Department of History (University of Vienna)

Alexander O’Hara is a Research Fellow in the Institut für Mittelalterforschung at the Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften and an Honorary Fellow of the Institute of Mediaeval History at the University of St Andrews. He received his doctorate from the University of St Andrews where he held a Donald Bullough and a Carnegie Scholarship. He completed his research Masters at the University of Oxford in 2005 and was a Norwegian Government Research Scholar at the University of Oslo from 2002 to 2003. His research focuses on the inter-relationship between monastic groups and secular elites in the Early Middle Ages, the transformation of the Frankish world in the seventh century, the cult of the saints in the Early and High Middle Ages, early medieval hagiography and its manuscript transmission, and with the Irish monastic founder, Columbanus, and his biographer, Jonas of Bobbio. He has completed a new translation of Jonas of Bobbio’s Life of Columbanus and His Disciples and a monograph on Jonas of Bobbio is in preparation. He was awarded a Research Grant from the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) for The Columbanian Network: Elite Identities and Christian Communities in Early Medieval Europe (550 – 750). This project, which runs from 2013 to 2016, explores how the role of monasteries and their relationship to the social world around them was transformed as monastic institutions became more integrated into social and political power networks. The project focuses on one of the central actors in this process, the Irish ascetic exile and monastic founder, Columbanus (c. 550 – 615), and the monastic network he and his Frankish disciples established in Merovingian Gaul and Lombard Italy.

Selected Publications:

  • ‘Patria, Peregrinatio, and Paenitentia: Identities of Alienation in the Seventh Century’, forthcoming in Walter Pohl & Gerda Heydemann (eds.), Post-Roman Transitions. Christian and Barbarian Identities in the Early Medieval West, CulturalEncounters in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages 14 (Turnhout, 2013).
  • ‘Aristocratic and Monastic Conflict in Tenth-Century Italy: The Case of Bobbio and the Miracula Sancti Columbani’ (with Faye Taylor), forthcoming in Viator 44 (2013).
  •  ‘Columbanus and Jonas of Bobbio: New Textual Witnesses’, Peritia 22/23 (2012), 188-190.
  • ‘Constructing a Saint: The Legend of St Sunniva in Twelfth-Century Norway’, Viking and Medieval Scandinavia 5 (2010), 105-121.
  • ‘The Audience of the Vita Columbani in Merovingian Gaul’, Early Medieval Europe 17 (2009), 126-153.
  • ‘Death and the Afterlife in Jonas of Bobbio’s Vita Columbani’, in Peter Clarke and Tony Claydon
  • (eds.), The Church, the Afterlife and the Fate of the Soul, Studies in Church History 45 (Woodbridge, 2009), 64-73.

Project Investigator cv  contact

Sukanya Raisharma, MA • Department of History (University of Vienna)

Sukanya Rai-Sharma started her BA at St. Stephen’s College, University of Delhi, before coming to the University of Cambridge on a Cambridge Commonwealth Trust scholarship to study Old and Middle English Language and Literature, as well as Old Norse Language and Literature. After graduation from her BA degree, Sukanya worked for the World Oral Literature Project at the University of Cambridge's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. This project investigated the range of languages spoken in the Indian state of Sikkim, focussing on the percentage of children who spoke minority languages, and the detection of which languages were in the process of becoming endangered. Its findings ultimately helped the state government to determine the most beneficial language policies in this ethnically diverse area.

Following her work on the World Oral Literature Project, Sukanya completed an MA in Medieval History at the University of London, where her thesis explored the ninth-century world chronicle of Ado of Vienne. From October 2013 to April 2014, she was a Visiting Graduate Student at the University of Cambridge, working under the supervision of Professor Rosamond McKitterick, before joining VISCOM in May 2014. In January 2015, Sukanya will head to the University of Oxford, where she will begin a D. Phil on the circulation and reception of pseudonymous texts in late antiquity, funded by the British Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Former Project Investigator   cv  contact

Anne Regourd, Dr. Institute for Social Anthropology (AAS)

Anne Regourd, Ph.D. in Philosophy (1987), teaches at the University of Paris 4-Sorbonne, and is Associee at the CNRS. She is the Academic supervizor of the Programme for Safeguarding manuscripts in private libraries of Zabid (Yemen), a Programme hosted by the French Center for Archaeology and Social Sciences (CEFAS). She published on Divinatory and Magic practices in Mediaeval Islam and contemporary Yemen (Religious Anthropology, History of Sciences) and in Arabic Philology (Epigraphy, papyrology). She is also a codicologist, specialized in papers of the Arabic manuscripts.

Projects and Publications relating to VISCOM:

  • Catalogue cumulé des manuscrits de bibliothèques privées de Zabid. 1. La bibliothèque de ‘Abd al-Rahman al-Hadhrami, fasc. 1, Les papiers filigranés (Sanaa, 2008)

  • (editor) Catalogue cumulé des manuscrits de bibliothèques privées de Zabid. 1. La bibliothèque de ‘Abd al-Rahman al-Hadhrami, fasc. 1 & 2, (Sanaa, 2006-2009)

  • (editor, together with E. Vallet), Chroniques du manuscrit au Yémen. Bi-annual and bilingual French/Arabic, on line journal (since 2006)

  • "Arabic Documents from the Cairo Geniza in the David Kaufmann Collection, Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences – Budapest ", together with the text edition of a single folio of a lost book by Gahiz, in: The Journal of Islamic Manuscripts 3/2 (2012).

  • "Stratégies de préservation/conservation dans le cadre du Programme Zabid (Yémen)", The Journal of Islamic Manuscripts 2/2(2011), 132-164.

  • "Chapter 24: Arabic Language Documents on Paper", in D. Peacock & L. Blue, Myos Hormos – Quseir al-Qadim. Roman and Islamic Ports on the Red Sea. Volume 2: The finds from the 1999 –

  • 2003 Excavations, Oxford, Archaeopress, 2011, “University of Southampton Series in Archaeology”, no. 6, 339-344.